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Canada election: Liberals sweep to power, Liberal Party, Conservative Party of Canada, New Democratic Party of Canada, Green Party of Canada, Canada 2015 federal election result, Canadian Election Results, Justin Trudeau,Canada Prime ministerial electi

Canada election: Liberals sweep to power, Liberal Party, Conservative Party of Canada, New Democratic Party of Canada, Green Party of Canada, Canada 2015 federal election result, Canadian Election Results, Justin Trudeau,Canada Prime ministerial election result,canada polls result,Federal election results

Canada's Liberal Party has decisively won a general election, ending nearly a decade of Conservative rule.

The centrist Liberals, led by Justin Trudeau, started the campaign in third place but in a stunning turnaround now command a majority.

Read more: Canada election: Liberals sweep to power, Liberal Party, Conservative Party of Canada, New...

Pakistan's Sharif sends mixed message to US, Latest world News, latest political news, latest news today, latest political news updates.

Pakistan's Sharif sends mixed message to US, Latest world News, latest political news, latest news today, latest political news updates.

RAIWIND, Pakistan

M Id 377782 Nawaz Sharif

Pakistan's presumptive prime minister said Monday that he wants good relations with the United States but criticized American drone strikes on militants as a violation of the country's sovereignty — perhaps hinting the government's grudging compliance may change.

A devout Muslim and a populist, Nawaz Sharif is expected to supplant President Asif Ali Zardari as the international face of Pakistan following his party's resounding victory in Saturday's election.

He is set to rule over a nuclear power whose increasing instability and Islamic militant havens are a global concern, especially at a time when the West is looking to end the war in neighboring Afghanistan.

The 63-year-old Sharif often hit out at the U.S. in statements while lobbying for votes, and he accused the outgoing government ruled by the Pakistan People's Party of selling out the country's sovereignty in exchange for U.S. aid.

However, analysts have cautioned that while such rhetoric sells on the campaign trail in a country where anti-American sentiment is high, Sharif is likely to take a more nuanced approach to U.S. relations once in office.

Sharif reinforced that sense Monday with his first comments since the vote about how he viewed the relationship with the U.S. — a key issue since Washington relies on Islamabad for help in fighting Islamic militants and negotiating an end to the Afghan war.

"I think we have good relations with the United States of America. We certainly have to listen to each other," said Sharif. "If there are any concerns on any side, I think we should address those concerns."

Pakistan and the U.S. have had an extremely fraught relationship in recent years, especially following the American raid that killed Osama bin Laden in a Pakistani army town in 2011. The U.S. didn't tell Pakistan about the operation beforehand, and the government was outraged at the breach of its sovereignty.

Even before the raid, the U.S. accused Pakistan of supporting Taliban militants who use the country's rugged northwest tribal region to launch cross-border attacks against American troops in Afghanistan — allegations denied by Islamabad.

The relationship has improved somewhat over the last year, but U.S. drone attacks targeting Taliban and al-Qaida militants in Pakistan's tribal region continue to create serious friction between the two countries.

The strikes are extremely unpopular in Pakistan, where many people believe they mostly kill innocent civilians — something Washington denies.

"Drones indeed are challenging our sovereignty," said Sharif. "I think this is a very serious issue, and our concern must be understood properly."

But Pakistan has a long history of officials condemning the strikes in public and supporting them in private, and how aggressively Sharif pushes the U.S. may depend on how much he needs it in other areas.

Pakistan relies on the U.S. for hundreds of millions of dollars in aid every year. More importantly, Pakistan would likely need U.S. support to get a bailout it desperately needs from the International Monetary Fund because of the government's shaky financial situation.

Sharif spoke with reporters at his palatial estate in the rural town of Raiwind near the eastern city of Lahore. The estate is filled with acres of plush lawns and manicured gardens, where scores of majestic peacocks roam freely. The inside of his house is opulently decorated in a style reminiscent of Louis XIV and features two stuffed lions — the symbol of Sharif's party — at the entrance to his living room.

Sharif's supporters believe his pro-business background and years of experience in government make him the right person to tackle the country's many economic woes, like growing power cuts, painful inflation and widespread unemployment.

His stance on reining in violent Islamic extremism, however, remains uncertain.

Critics have accused his Pakistan Muslim League-N party of being soft on radicals because it hasn't cracked down on militant groups in its stronghold of Punjab province.

Even if Sharif wanted to shut down the U.S. drone program, he would have to contend with the wishes of the Pakistani army, which is considered the strongest institution in the country and often plays a dominant role in national security issues.

The army is known to have supported the drone program in the past. That cooperation has decreased over time as the relationship between the two countries has deteriorated. Many analysts believe there is still grudging acceptance of the strikes — both because of U.S. aid and because of the harm it would do to the relationship if Pakistan really put its foot down.

The number of strikes targeting militants has dropped from a peak of more than 120 in 2010 to close to a dozen so far this year, but it's unclear how much this trend has been driven by U.S. decisions about targeting versus the political sensitivity of carrying out strikes.

The U.S. is reliant on Pakistan for help in neighboring Afghanistan, where it will likely play a strong role in any reconciliation deal with Taliban militants. Also, much of the American military equipment that must be shipped out of Afghanistan when the international coalition there ends its combat mission in 2014 will go through the port city of Karachi in southern Pakistan.

Sharif said that he would facilitate the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan.

"American troops are being withdrawn in 2014. We will extend full support to them. We will see that everything goes well and smoothly," he said.

Sharif's party, the Pakistan Muslim League-N, appeared set to get a majority of seats in the national assembly following Saturday's election. That would place Sharif in the position of becoming prime minister for a third time and give him a strong mandate to address the country's many problems.

Following a constitutional amendment passed in 2010, the post of prime minister is much stronger than that of the presidency in Pakistan.

But Sharif's party will have to run most legislation through the Senate, where the former ruling party, the Pakistan People's Party, will retain a much higher number of seats until the next election in 2015. That means he will have to find some way to cooperate with his rival.

Sharif, meanwhile, appealed to former cricket star turned politician Imran Khan to drop his claims of vote rigging in Karachi and Punjab.

"I think we should all show sportsman's spirit and accept the results of the elections," Sharif said.

Several thousand supporters of Khan's Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf party protested the alleged vote rigging in Karachi and the capital, Islamabad, on Monday.

Election observers from the European Union said they saw some "serious problems" in Karachi, and Pakistan's election commission said it was investigating. The commission already has said it would re-do the vote in 40 polling stations in one constituency in Karachi.

But the Human Rights Commission of Pakistan, which had observers monitoring the vote, said they did not find any evidence of systematic rigging and called on all parties to accept the vote.

The Free and Fair Election Network, a Pakistani monitoring group with thousands of observers, has described the balloting in Punjab as "relatively fair."

Sharif's victory in the election represented a remarkable comeback. He was toppled in a coup in 1999 by then-army chief Gen. Pervez Musharraf during his second stint as prime minister and sent into exile in Saudi Arabia for years. He returned in 2007 and ended up serving as the main opposition leader in the country.

Sharif's history with the military has led some observers to predict clashes with the army once he takes office, although the service has pulled back from overt interference in domestic politics in recent years.

Sharif sought to play down his perceived enmity toward the army, saying he only blamed Musharraf for the coup, not the entire service.

"I think the rest of the army resented Mr. Musharraf's decision," said Sharif. "So I don't hold the rest of the army responsible for that."


source:http://news.yahoo.com

List of Prime Minister Of England,Prime Minister of the England, Council of Prime Minister of England, U K Prime minister,List Of Prime minister Of United Kingdom.Prime minister List, England Prime minister,Prime minister list Of United kingdom.

List of Prime Minister Of England,Prime Minister of the England, Council of Prime Minister of England, U K Prime minister,List Of Prime minister Of United Kingdom.Prime minister List, England Prime minister,Prime minister list Of United kingdom.

                           Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom

                                      Official-photo-cameron


          Current Prime Minister David Cameron was appointed on 11 May 2010

Prime Minister Start date End date Total time
of (first) term of (final) term in office

Robert Walpole

 

4 April 1721 11 February 1742 7,618 days

Spencer Compton

 

16 February 1742 2 July 1743[1] 501 days

Henry Pelham

 

27 August 1743 6 March 1754[1] 3,844 days

Thomas Pelham-Holles

 

16 March 1754 26 May 1762 2,765 days

William Cavendish

 

16 November 1756 25 June 1757 221 days

John Stuart

 

26 May 1762 8 April 1763 317 days

George Grenville

 

16 April 1763 13 July 1765 819 days


Charles Watson-Wentworth

13 July 1765 1 July 1782[1] 478 days


William Pitt the Elder

30 July 1766 14 October 1768 807 days


Augustus FitzRoy

14 October 1768 28 January 1770 471 days


Frederick North

28 January 1770 22 March 1782 4,436 days


William Petty

4 July 1782 2 April 1783 272 days


William Cavendish-Bentinck

2 April 1783 4 October 1809 1,179 days


William Pitt the Younger

19 December 1783 23 January 1806[1] 6,917 days


Henry Addington

17 March 1801 10 May 1804 1,150 days


William Grenville

11 February 1806 31 March 1807 413 days


Spencer Perceval

4 October 1809 11 May 1812[2] 950 days


Robert Jenkinson

8 June 1812 9 April 1827 5,418 days


George Canning

10 April 1827 8 August 1827[1] 120 days


Frederick Robinson

31 August 1827 21 January 1828 143 days


Arthur Wellesley

22 January 1828 10 December 1834 1,055 days


Charles Grey

22 November 1830 16 July 1834 1,332 days


William Lamb

16 July 1834 30 August 1841 2,447 days


Robert Peel

10 December 1834 29 June 1846 1,883 days


John Russell

30 June 1846 28 June 1866 2,306 days


Edward Smith-Stanley

23 February 1852 27 February 1868 1,386 days


George Hamilton-Gordon

19 December 1852 30 January 1855 772 days


Henry Temple

6 February 1855 18 October 1865[1] 3,429 days


Benjamin Disraeli

27 February 1868 21 April 1880 2,530 days


William Ewart Gladstone

3 December 1868 2 March 1894 4,508 days


Robert Cecil

23 June 1885 11 July 1902 5,000 days


Archibald Primrose

5 March 1894 22 June 1895 474 days


Arthur Balfour

11 July 1902 5 December 1905 1,243 days


Henry Campbell-Bannerman

5 December 1905 3 April 1908 850 days


Herbert Asquith

5 April 1908 5 December 1916 3,166 days


David Lloyd George

7 December 1916 22 October 1922 2,145 days


Bonar Law

23 October 1922 22 May 1923 211 days


Stanley Baldwin

23 May 1923 28 May 1937 2,633 days


Ramsay MacDonald

22 January 1924 7 June 1935 2,480 days


Neville Chamberlain

28 May 1937 10 May 1940 1,078 days


Winston Churchill

10 May 1940 7 April 1955 3,162 days


Clement Attlee

26 July 1945 26 October 1951 2,283 days


Anthony Eden

7 April 1955 10 January 1957 644 days


Harold Macmillan

10 January 1957 18 October 1963 2,472 days


Alec Douglas-Home

18 October 1963 16 October 1964 364 days


Harold Wilson

16 October 1964 5 April 1976 2,835 days


Edward Heath

19 June 1970 4 March 1974 1,354 days


James Callaghan

5 April 1976 4 May 1979 1,124 days


Margaret Thatcher

4 May 1979 28 November 1990 4,226 days


John Major

28 November 1990 2 May 1997 2,347 days


Tony Blair

2 May 1997 27 June 2007 3,708 days


Gordon Brown

27 June 2007 11 May 2010 1,049 days


David Cameron

11 May 2010 Incumbent 1,017 days































































































































































 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

source:http://en.wikipedia.org


Budget app,Government launches Budget app, Latest news today , latest political updates, latest political news,latest world political updates.

Budget app,Government launches Budget app, Latest news today , latest political updates, latest political news,latest world political updates.

Budget2012--Bill-English--Getty-Images

People will be able see how much tax they pay and how their tax dollars are being spent by using the latest smartphone application - the Budget app.

The Government will launch it's new app for smartphones and tablets on Thursday, featuring interactive features.

Finance Minister Bill English says as well as providing the tax information, people will be able to access the full set of Budget documents and monthly economic updates from Treasury.

The new technology means there has been a reduced print run on copies of the actual Budget.


source:http://www.farmingshow.com/

List of Presidents France,Presidents of the Council of Ministers of France,Presidents of the France, France Presidents,List Of President In France.President List Of France,France Presidents,President list France.

 

 

 

List of Presidents France,Presidents of the Council of Ministers of France,Presidents of the FranceFrance Presidents,List Of President In France.President List Of France,France Presidents,President list France.


Photo NAME Starting Year Ending Year
 François Hollande (Journées de Nantes 2012).jpg François Hollande 15-May-12 Incumbent
Served as the First Secretary of the French Socialist Party 1997–2008, as a Deputy of the National Assembly for Corrèze's 1st Constituency 1988–1993, 1997. He was the Mayor of Tulle 2001–2008, and was the President of the Corrèze General Council 2008–2012. The second left-wing President of the Fifth Republic. Elected in the 2012 election, defeating Nicolas Sarkozy.
 Nicolas Sarkozy (2008).jpg Nicolas Sarkozy 5/16/2007 15 May 2012
Held various ministerial posts 1993–1995 and 2002–2007. Leader of the UMP since 2004. In the 2007 election, he topped the first round poll, and was elected in the second round against Ségolène Royal. Soon after taking office, he introduced the French fiscal package of 2007 and other laws to counter illegal immigration and recidivism. President of the Council of the EU in 2008, he defended the Treaty of Lisbon and mediated in the South Ossetia War; at national level, he had to deal with the financial crisis and its consequences. Following the 2008 constitutional reform, he became the first President since Louis-Napoléon Bonaparte to address the Versailles Congress on 22 June 2009. President of the G8 and the G20 in 2011. Defeated in the 2012 election.
 Jacques Chirac.jpg Jacques Chirac 5/17/1995 5/16/2007
Prime Minister 1974–1976; on resignation, founded the RPR. Eliminated in the first round of the 1981 election, he again served as Prime Minister 1986–1988. Beaten in the 1988 election, he was elected in the 1995 election. He engaged in social reforms to counter "social fracture". In 1997, he dissolved the Assemblée nationale; a left-wing victory in the 1997 legislative elections, forced him to name Lionel Jospin Prime Minister for a five-year cohabitation. Presidential terms reduced from seven to five years. In 2002, he was re-elected against the leader of the extreme right-wing Jean-Marie Le Pen. Opposed the Iraq War. He did not run in 2007, he retired from political life and returned to the Conseil constitutionnel.
 Reagan Mitterrand 1984 (cropped 2).jpg Francois Mitterrand 5/21/1981 5/17/1995
Candidate of a united left-wing ticket in the 1965 election, he founded the Socialist Party in 1971. Having narrowly lost the 1974 election, he was finally elected in the 1981 election. He instigated several reforms (abolition of the death penalty, a fifth week of paid leave for employees). After the right-wing victory in the 1986 legislative elections, he named Jacques Chirac Prime Minister, thus beginning the first cohabitation. Re-elected in the 1988 election against Chirac, he was again forced to cohabit with Édouard Balladur following the 1993 legislative elections. He retired in 1995 after the conclusion of his second term. He was the first President elected twice by universal suffrage, he was the first left-wing President of the Fifth Republic, and his Presidential tenure was the longest of the Fifth Republic.
 Valéry Giscard d’Estaing 1978(3).jpg Valery Giscard dEstaing 5/27/1974 5/21/1981
Founder of the FNRI and later the UDF in his efforts to unify the centre-right, he served in several Gaullist governments. Narrowly elected in the 1974 election, he instigated numerous reforms, including the lowering of the age of civil majority from 21 to 18, and the legalisation of abortion. He soon faced a global economic crisis and rising unemployment. Although the polls initially gave him a lead, he was defeated in the 1981 election by François Mitterrand, partly due to the disunion within the right wing.
 Georges Pompidou - Bundesarchiv B 145 Bild-F020538-0006.jpg Georges Pompidou 6/20/1969 4/2/1974
Prime Minister under Charles de Gaulle 1962–1968. Elected President in the 1969 election against the centrist Alain Poher. Favoured European integration. Supported economic modernisation and industrialisation. Faced the 1973 oil crisis. †Died in office of Waldenström's macroglobulinemia, two years before the end of his mandate.
 Charles de Gaulle-1963.jpg Charles de Gaulle 1/8/1959 4/28/1969
President of the Provisional Government 1944–1946. Appointed President of the Council by René Coty in May 1958, to resolve the crisis of the Algerian War. He adopted a new Constitution, thus founding the Fifth Republic. Easily elected President in the 1958 election by electoral college, he took office the following month; he was re-elected by universal suffrage in the 1965 election. In 1966, he withdrew France from NATO integrated military command, and expelled the American bases on French soil. Having refused to step down during the crisis of May 1968, he finally resigned following the failure of the 1969 referendum on regionalisation.
 René Coty en 1948.JPG Rene Coty 1/16/1954 1/8/1959
Presidency marked by the Algerian War; appealed to Charles de Gaulle to resolve the May 1958 crisis. Following the promulgation of the Fifth Republic, he resigned after five years as President, giving way to de Gaulle.
 VincentAuriol.png Vincent Auriol 1/16/1947 1/16/1954
First President of the Fourth Republic, his term was marked by the First Indochina War.
 Albert Lebrun 1937.jpg Albert Lebrun 5/10/1932 7/11/1947
Re-elected in 1939, his second term was interrupted de facto by the rise to power of Marshal Philippe Pétain.
 Paul Doumer.jpg Paul Doumer 6/13/1931 5/7/1932
Elected in the second round of the 1931 election, having displaced the pacifist Aristide Briand. †Assassinated (shot) by the mentally unstable Paul Gorguloff.
 Gaston Doumergue 2.jpg Gaston Doumergue 6/13/1924 6/13/1931
The first Protestant President, he took a firm political stance against Germany and its resurgent nationalism. His seven-year term was marked by ministerial discontinuity.
 Alexandre Millerand, 12e président de la République française.jpg Alexandre Millerand 9/23/1920 6/11/1924
An "Independent Socialist" increasingly drawn to the right wing, he resigned after four years following the victory of the Cartel des Gauches in the 1924 legislative elections.
 Paul Deschanel 01.jpg Paul Deschanel 2/18/1920 9/21/1920
An intellectual elected to the Académie française, he overcame the popular Georges Clemenceau, to general surprise, in the January 1920 election. He resigned after eight months due to mental health problems.Clemenceau, to general surprise, in the January 1920 election. He resigned after eight months due to mental health problems.
Poincare larger.jpg Raymond Poincare 2/18/1913 2/18/1920
President during World War I. He subsequently served as President of the Council 1922–1924 and 1926–1929.1922–1924 and 1926–1929
 Armand Fallieres.jpg Armand Fallieres 2/18/1906 2/18/1913
President during the Agadir Crisis, when French troops first occupied Morocco. He was a party to the Triple Entente, which he strengthened by diplomacy. Like his predecessor, he did not seek re-election.Clemenceau, to general surprise, in the January 1920 election. He resigned after eight months due to mental health problems.
Emile Loubet.jpg Emile Loubet 1899-02-18 2/18/1906
During his seven-year term, the 1905 French law on the Separation of the Churches and the State was adopted, and only four Presidents of the Council succeeded to the Hôtel Matignon. He did not seek re-election at the end of his term.1922–1924 and 1926–1929.
 Felix Faure.jpg Felix Faure 1895-01-17 1899-02-16
Pursued colonial expansion and ties with Russia. President during the Dreyfus Affair. †Four years into his term he died of apoplexy at the Élysée Palace, allegedly in flagrante.party to the Triple Entente, which he strengthened by diplomacy. Like his predecessor, he did not seek re-election.
 Jean Casimir-Perier.jpg Jean Casimir Perier 1894-06-27 1895-01-16
Perier's was the shortest Presidential term: he resigned after six months and 20 days.
 Marie Francois Sadi Carnot.jpg Marie Francois Sadi Carnot 1887-12-03 1894-06-25
His term was marked by boulangist unrest and the Panama scandals, and by diplomacy with Russia. †Assassinated (stabbed) by Sante Geronimo Caserio a few months before the end of his mandate, he is interred at the Panthéon, Paris.
 Bonnat Portrait of Jules Grevy cropped.jpg Jules Grevy 1879-01-30 1887-12-02
The first President to complete a full term, he was easily re-elected in December 1885. He was nonetheless forced to resign, following an honours scandal in which his son-in-law was implicated.
 Patrice-mac-mahon.jpg Patrice de Mac Mahon 1873-05-24 1879-01-30
A Marshal of France, he was the only monarchist (and only Duke) to serve as President of the Third Republic. He resigned shortly after the Republican victory in the 1877 legislative elections, following his decision to dissolve the Chamber of Deputies. During his term, the French Constitutional Laws of 1875 that served as the Constitution of the Third Republic were passed, and he therefore became the first President under the constitutional settlement that would last until 1940.
 Adolphe Thiers Nadar 2.JPG Adolphe Thiers 1871-08-31 1873-05-24
Initially a moderate monarchist, named President following the adoption of the Rivet law. He became a Republican during his term, and resigned in the face of hostility from the Assemblée nationale, largely in favour of a return to monarchy.
 Napoleon-3.jpg Louis Napoleon Bonaparte 1848-12-20 1871-12-02
Nephew of Napoléon I. Elected first President of the French Republic, in the 1848 election against Louis-Eugène Cavaignac. He provoked the French coup of 1851, and proclaimed himself Emperor the following year. (2 December 1852 -4 September 1870)

 

 

 

 

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Lok Sabha 2019 Polls

Which Party Will Form Government in Lok Sabha Elections 2019?

BJP (NDA) - 63.4%
INC (UPA) - 28%
Third Front - 8.6%

Total votes: 917
The voting for this poll has ended on: 19 Apr 2019 - 00:00

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